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shannongoodpress:

Michelle Obama Honors Janelle Monae At Grammy Luncheon
published on July 18 by Shannon
First Lady Michelle Obama delivered the keynote address at the Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Awards Luncheon Wednesday on the importance of arts education in our school system. She was also there to honor singer Janelle Monae for her mentorship with young students through the Grammy Museum’s educational efforts. The six-time Grammy nominated singer was honored along with teacher Sunshine Cavalluzzi.
As she honored Monae, Mrs. Obama spoke about the importance of the arts in education to the our children, while adding that an expansion of the program is needed so that every child is involved.
 “Engagement in the arts can unlock a world of possibilities for our young people. … For many young people, arts education is the only reason they get out of bed in the morning,” Michelle said (via the Los Angeles Times). “Just like Janelle, they go to school each day because there’s an instrument they want to play, a musical they want to perform in, a painting they are dying to finish. So then once they arrive in those classrooms, that’s when we can teach them something else, like math and writing and science. That is the power of the arts for so many of our young people.”
Janelle Monae also gave a moving performance at the event. 
images courtesy of Getty
shannongoodpress:

Michelle Obama Honors Janelle Monae At Grammy Luncheon
published on July 18 by Shannon
First Lady Michelle Obama delivered the keynote address at the Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Awards Luncheon Wednesday on the importance of arts education in our school system. She was also there to honor singer Janelle Monae for her mentorship with young students through the Grammy Museum’s educational efforts. The six-time Grammy nominated singer was honored along with teacher Sunshine Cavalluzzi.
As she honored Monae, Mrs. Obama spoke about the importance of the arts in education to the our children, while adding that an expansion of the program is needed so that every child is involved.
 “Engagement in the arts can unlock a world of possibilities for our young people. … For many young people, arts education is the only reason they get out of bed in the morning,” Michelle said (via the Los Angeles Times). “Just like Janelle, they go to school each day because there’s an instrument they want to play, a musical they want to perform in, a painting they are dying to finish. So then once they arrive in those classrooms, that’s when we can teach them something else, like math and writing and science. That is the power of the arts for so many of our young people.”
Janelle Monae also gave a moving performance at the event. 
images courtesy of Getty
shannongoodpress:

Michelle Obama Honors Janelle Monae At Grammy Luncheon
published on July 18 by Shannon
First Lady Michelle Obama delivered the keynote address at the Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Awards Luncheon Wednesday on the importance of arts education in our school system. She was also there to honor singer Janelle Monae for her mentorship with young students through the Grammy Museum’s educational efforts. The six-time Grammy nominated singer was honored along with teacher Sunshine Cavalluzzi.
As she honored Monae, Mrs. Obama spoke about the importance of the arts in education to the our children, while adding that an expansion of the program is needed so that every child is involved.
 “Engagement in the arts can unlock a world of possibilities for our young people. … For many young people, arts education is the only reason they get out of bed in the morning,” Michelle said (via the Los Angeles Times). “Just like Janelle, they go to school each day because there’s an instrument they want to play, a musical they want to perform in, a painting they are dying to finish. So then once they arrive in those classrooms, that’s when we can teach them something else, like math and writing and science. That is the power of the arts for so many of our young people.”
Janelle Monae also gave a moving performance at the event. 
images courtesy of Getty
shannongoodpress:

Michelle Obama Honors Janelle Monae At Grammy Luncheon
published on July 18 by Shannon
First Lady Michelle Obama delivered the keynote address at the Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Awards Luncheon Wednesday on the importance of arts education in our school system. She was also there to honor singer Janelle Monae for her mentorship with young students through the Grammy Museum’s educational efforts. The six-time Grammy nominated singer was honored along with teacher Sunshine Cavalluzzi.
As she honored Monae, Mrs. Obama spoke about the importance of the arts in education to the our children, while adding that an expansion of the program is needed so that every child is involved.
 “Engagement in the arts can unlock a world of possibilities for our young people. … For many young people, arts education is the only reason they get out of bed in the morning,” Michelle said (via the Los Angeles Times). “Just like Janelle, they go to school each day because there’s an instrument they want to play, a musical they want to perform in, a painting they are dying to finish. So then once they arrive in those classrooms, that’s when we can teach them something else, like math and writing and science. That is the power of the arts for so many of our young people.”
Janelle Monae also gave a moving performance at the event. 
images courtesy of Getty
shannongoodpress:

Michelle Obama Honors Janelle Monae At Grammy Luncheon
published on July 18 by Shannon
First Lady Michelle Obama delivered the keynote address at the Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Awards Luncheon Wednesday on the importance of arts education in our school system. She was also there to honor singer Janelle Monae for her mentorship with young students through the Grammy Museum’s educational efforts. The six-time Grammy nominated singer was honored along with teacher Sunshine Cavalluzzi.
As she honored Monae, Mrs. Obama spoke about the importance of the arts in education to the our children, while adding that an expansion of the program is needed so that every child is involved.
 “Engagement in the arts can unlock a world of possibilities for our young people. … For many young people, arts education is the only reason they get out of bed in the morning,” Michelle said (via the Los Angeles Times). “Just like Janelle, they go to school each day because there’s an instrument they want to play, a musical they want to perform in, a painting they are dying to finish. So then once they arrive in those classrooms, that’s when we can teach them something else, like math and writing and science. That is the power of the arts for so many of our young people.”
Janelle Monae also gave a moving performance at the event. 
images courtesy of Getty
shannongoodpress:

Michelle Obama Honors Janelle Monae At Grammy Luncheon
published on July 18 by Shannon
First Lady Michelle Obama delivered the keynote address at the Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Awards Luncheon Wednesday on the importance of arts education in our school system. She was also there to honor singer Janelle Monae for her mentorship with young students through the Grammy Museum’s educational efforts. The six-time Grammy nominated singer was honored along with teacher Sunshine Cavalluzzi.
As she honored Monae, Mrs. Obama spoke about the importance of the arts in education to the our children, while adding that an expansion of the program is needed so that every child is involved.
 “Engagement in the arts can unlock a world of possibilities for our young people. … For many young people, arts education is the only reason they get out of bed in the morning,” Michelle said (via the Los Angeles Times). “Just like Janelle, they go to school each day because there’s an instrument they want to play, a musical they want to perform in, a painting they are dying to finish. So then once they arrive in those classrooms, that’s when we can teach them something else, like math and writing and science. That is the power of the arts for so many of our young people.”
Janelle Monae also gave a moving performance at the event. 
images courtesy of Getty
shannongoodpress:

Michelle Obama Honors Janelle Monae At Grammy Luncheon
published on July 18 by Shannon
First Lady Michelle Obama delivered the keynote address at the Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Awards Luncheon Wednesday on the importance of arts education in our school system. She was also there to honor singer Janelle Monae for her mentorship with young students through the Grammy Museum’s educational efforts. The six-time Grammy nominated singer was honored along with teacher Sunshine Cavalluzzi.
As she honored Monae, Mrs. Obama spoke about the importance of the arts in education to the our children, while adding that an expansion of the program is needed so that every child is involved.
 “Engagement in the arts can unlock a world of possibilities for our young people. … For many young people, arts education is the only reason they get out of bed in the morning,” Michelle said (via the Los Angeles Times). “Just like Janelle, they go to school each day because there’s an instrument they want to play, a musical they want to perform in, a painting they are dying to finish. So then once they arrive in those classrooms, that’s when we can teach them something else, like math and writing and science. That is the power of the arts for so many of our young people.”
Janelle Monae also gave a moving performance at the event. 
images courtesy of Getty

shannongoodpress:

Michelle Obama Honors Janelle Monae At Grammy Luncheon

published on July 18 by Shannon

First Lady Michelle Obama delivered the keynote address at the Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Awards Luncheon Wednesday on the importance of arts education in our school system. She was also there to honor singer Janelle Monae for her mentorship with young students through the Grammy Museum’s educational efforts. The six-time Grammy nominated singer was honored along with teacher Sunshine Cavalluzzi.

As she honored Monae, Mrs. Obama spoke about the importance of the arts in education to the our children, while adding that an expansion of the program is needed so that every child is involved.

“Engagement in the arts can unlock a world of possibilities for our young people. … For many young people, arts education is the only reason they get out of bed in the morning,” Michelle said (via the Los Angeles Times). “Just like Janelle, they go to school each day because there’s an instrument they want to play, a musical they want to perform in, a painting they are dying to finish. So then once they arrive in those classrooms, that’s when we can teach them something else, like math and writing and science. That is the power of the arts for so many of our young people.”

Janelle Monae also gave a moving performance at the event.

images courtesy of Getty



I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

I wrote about everything I didn’t write on The Fame. While traveling the world for two years, I’ve encountered several monsters, each represented by a different song on the new record: my ‘Fear of Sex Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Alcohol Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Love Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Death Monster,’ my ‘Fear of Loneliness Monster,’ etc. I spent a lot of nights in Eastern Europe, and this album is a pop experimentation with industrial/Goth beats, 90’s dance melodies, an obsession with the lyrical genius of 80’s melancholic pop, and the runway. I wrote while watching muted fashion shows and I am compelled to say my music was scored for them.

(Source: perrygaga)



"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."

"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."

"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."

"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."

"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."

"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."

"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."

"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."
"She is an hour late. Suddenly the curtains part and Lady Gaga makes her entrance, mincing into the room holding a porcelain teacup and saucer in one hand and a wineglass in the other. Like fainting on command or dropping a glove, Gaga seems to have single-handedly revived the long-lost art of making an entrance."

(Source: arrtpop)


I just saw your Katy Perry post and i was thinking a little bit about it and I don't think personally that Perry was trying to offend anyone its just how her backup dancers were perceived. She's young we all do stupid things when were young! from slutdad

Hi there, I’m glad you’re thinking about my Perry-blackface-dancers post, but I think you need to dig deeper.  The truth is, whether or not Perry was trying to offend anyone, she still dressed her dancers in outfits that greatly resemble racist stereotypes of black women’s bodies and directed them to dance in hypersexual ways that reference racist stereotypes of black women’s culture (twerking and “pat their weaves” while groping themselves and each other). 

As an artist, Perry’s intentions are not the last word on her work.  When she puts a performance out into the world, her audiences perception of the work takes over and becomes part of the work as well.  And in this case, the perception that this performance is racist is based on a long cultural history of white women and men mocking the “big titties and big booties” of “ghetto black hos.”  That’s not a perception you can just wave away, you see.  I recommend you click through that link and give it a read, and check out this previous ask for more on titties/booties in modern blackface.

As for the age of Perry, she’s a grown-ass 29-year-old woman and this performance was like a month ago and is a fixture of her current Prismatic tour.  You know she’s being stupid, you said so yourself … at what age do you think she should be held responsible for perpetuating damaging racist stereotypes for her own personal gain?